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20120930
20121008
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
very much, it is a pleasure. >> you have been involved in computer science most of your adult left. >> i have a ph.d. >> rose: yes. that qualifies you. how did you get invved in this, though, the technology of voting? >> well, in 2003, a colleague of mine, david dill, a professor at stanford discovered that silicon centrally, santa clara county was about to buy voting machines to be used there and several of us were just astounded because as computer scientists we know that the computers and the voting machines can have software bugs or even hidden malicious code so we got involved. >> rose: as all computers. >> like all computers, exactly and so we got involved, with trying to stop this purchase, in silicon valley and right in the heart of silicon valley and we didn't succeed. >> rose: you could not change the direction. >> we lost three to two. the election officials wanted to believe the vendors over us because the vendors assured them everything is safe. >> rose: and there was your appointment to the international workshop on international voting president clinton, this book ki
science say the reef has lost half of its coral cover over the past 27 years. there are multiple causes, including a destructive kind of starfish shown here. we look at what's behind it and what's at stake-- in australia and around the world-- with nancy knowlton, a coral reef biologist and a chair of marine science at the smithsonian national museum of natural history here in washington. welcome. >> thanks. how has all of this coral died off? do we know what's causing it? is it all that... >> it's not all the star fish. the star fish is about 42%. typhoons, big strong storms another 48% and then coral bleaching is the remaining 10% which is caused whenever the water gets too hot. >> ifill: so this is human causedded? >> yes. most of it is human caused. i mean a coral reef naturally goes through cycles of up and down. but it shouldn't be declining by half over course of 27 years. >> ifill: i feel like we have talked before about the declining coral cover. but not... but i'm wondering whether it's now picking up speed or whether this is just a natural deterioration that we should just be
of marine science released a report tuesday saying a number of reeves has gone from 100 to 47 since 1985. experts blame the rapid increase in crown of thornz star fish which eat the coral. they found that ocean warming is a major cause of coral bleaching and prevents the coral from recovering from cyclone damage and they worry that it could halve againy the next decade if current trends continue. >> we believe if we can take action, the crown of thorn star fish, it may leave the reef in a position that can better withstand the climactic impact. >> the great barrier reef extends more than 2,000 kilometers off the coast of northeastern australia and is a world heritage site. >>> a gallery of japanese art has opened at an art museum in melbourne, australia. a ceremony was held on tuesday for the opening of the paulen gander gallery of japanese art named after gandel who donated her collection of japanese art. they performed a japanese ritual to celebrate the opening and the exhibits include a buddhist statue from the 8th to 12th century and a hanging scroll by an 18th century artist. it has
to uphold the constitution. >> reporter: rachel caufield is a professor of political science at drake university and a research fellow at the american judicature society. she thinks it's the family leader and other conservative groups around the country, that are inserting money and politics into the judicial system. >> i think we have a movement afoot to politicize our courts and in politicizing our courts i think basically that undermines the quality of justice in america. there's definitely a trend nationwide. we've seen a huge increase in campaign spending among judicial candidates, many of whom are supported by similar interest groups. >> reporter: according to the nonpartisan group called justice at stake, from 2000 to 2009, money spent on state supreme court justice races jumped more than two and a half times to over $206 million. in iowa in 2010, money spent, mostly from out of state totaled over $1.2 million to unelect the three justices there with ads like this -- >> if they can redefine marriage none of the freedoms we hold dear are safe from judicial activism. to hold acti
provided by: and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the first presidential debate is behind them, but the two sides went at it again today. republicans said their man took it to the president in the denver duel. the obama camp charged the truth got trampled in the process. >> la night i thought was a great opportunity for the american people to see two very different visions for the country. and -- (applause) -- and i think it was helpful to be able to describe those visions. i said the president's vision is trick-down gornment and i don't think that's what america believes in. i see instead a prosperity that comes through freedom. >> reporter: romney's reception at the event was reinforced by instant polling that he won last night's encounter by
,000 new math and science teachers, and create two million more slots in our community colleges so that people can get trained for the jobs that are out there right now. and i want to make sure that we keep tuition low for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, governor romney and i both agree that our corporate tax rate is too high. so i want to lower it, particularly for manufacturing, taking it down to 25%. but i also want to close those loopholes that areiving inenties for coanie tha are shipping jobs overseas. i want to provide tax breaks for companies that are investing here in the united states. on energy, governor romney and i both agree that we've got to boost american energy production, and oil and natural gas production are higher than they've been in years. but i also believe that we've got to look at the energy sources of the future, like wind and solar and biofuels, and make those ininvestments. so all of this is possible. now, in order for us to do it, we do have to close our deficit, and one of the things i'm sure we'll be discussing tonight is how do we d
, attention and enthusiasm, it matters which voters turn out where. dave robertson, a political science professor at the university of missouri st. louis, says the topsy-turvy election has cut both ways. >> one of the things akin has been able to do is electrify some of the conservative base. but there's a counter movement to that. and that is he's also helped electrify somef the female voters in the state, some of the moderate voters in the state, some of the key voters in the suburbs of this state that are going to determine the outcome of this election. and that's a real disadvantage for him. >> ifill: akin is counting on conservatives, home schooling parents, and evangelicals to rally around his cause. >> we don't tell you who to vote for, but i'm going to tell you how to vote. >> ifill: reverend stoney shaw, pastor of ferguson first baptist church, has known akin for 25 years. >> some of my family, my children were, "dad, how can you support him? everybody is turning against him." i said, "you know, there was another guy everybody turned against-- jesus christ-- but he prevailed. a
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)